Author: Trevor Munson

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 Review

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3 is going to sell a lot of copies. The Call of Duty franchise has left its mark on gaming forever with its accessible multiplayer and addictive leveling structure. A Call of Duty game has held the top spot on Xbox live charts since the first Modern Warfare released. It went from simply a game to a pop culture icon overnight. Call of Duty 4 was globally hailed as one of the best shooters of all time. The explosive campaign was a thrill ride the likes of which had never been seen before. Fast forward to 2011, three CoD games later, does the formula still hold up? Critics of the series lambast its refusal to innovate. Does Modern Warfare 3 change it up enough to sway the hearts and minds of the haters? In short, no, but that doesn’t keep MW3 from being a damn fun game if you’re in the right mindset.

The Rum Diary: Review

The Rum Diary

 

According to mirror theory you can see the author’s own experiences, fears, and opinions reflected in their work. No writer’s catalogue is more representative of mirror theory than Hunter S. Thompson. The inventor of the “gonzo” style of journalism, he penned “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas”, one of my favorite books, and the film adaptation, of which I consider to be Johnny Depp’s greatest film. “The Rum Diary” tells the story of a young budding journalist named Paul Kemp and his adventures in the island paradise of Puerto Rico. Kemp mirrors a much younger Thompson than his counterpart Duke in Fear and Loathing. Kemp is more openly idealistic and brash, and much less twisted on drugs (unless you count alcohol as a drug). The result is a tamer experience than “Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas” , and one that is much more erratic in quality.

Drive Second Opinion


The first time I saw Drive, I couldn’t keep any of my thoughts together. I only knew two things going in: first that supreme badasses Bryan Cranston and Ron Perlman were co-starring, and second that Nicolas Winding Refn, director of the ill-received art piece Valhalla Rising, was at the helm. What kept Valhalla Rising from greatness was the fact that it really doesn’t function as a movie. While every shot in the film is excruciatingly beautiful and the cinematography is a wonder, all but the most patient and attentive viewers are forced to ask: “What just happened?” when the credits roll. Luckily all it took was a good producer to bind Refn’s creativity to reality for this masterpiece to come to fruition. Drive is easily the best movie of the year so far and my personal favorite film from the last 5 years.