Tag: 3DS

Persona Q: Shadow of the Labyrinth Review: Acid Redux

Persona-Q-Shadow-of-the-Labyrinth-ReviewI have spent a lot of time living from April 11th, 2011 to March 20th, 2012. I’ve lived it once, twice, three times. I’ve turned over the events in my head, and I’ve filled in the gaps. I’ve watched other people live that year, and I’ve read about other people living that year. I’ve thought about going back and living it again.

Persona Q: Shadow of the Labyrinth thinks I should move on.

Shovel Knight Review: Rose-Tinted Glasses

In almost every review I write, there is inevitably a point at which it will be tempting to fill a paragraph with pointless comparisons. “It’s a GTA-style open-world game,” or “a fast-paced Call of Duty-type shooter.” I do my best to avoid these comparisons, because I think they’re a little cheap, and more than a little easy. Every now and then a game comes along, however, that is practically begging to be compared. Enter Shovel Knight.

Tomodachi Life Review: Fleeting Charm

tomodachi lifeOn the morning of my fifth day with Tomodachi Life I booted up my 3DS and started the game. During the initial load a light caught my 3DS at just the right angle and I saw myself through the glare. Eyes drooping, mouth frowning, I looked into the mirror of my soul and wondered why. Why was I so desperate to see what my Miis were up to? Why won’t Chie and my look-alike start dating? Why does Evan like sports? Why is Michael upset? Why am I so set on checking my Island every 30 minutes for something new to do?

Mario Golf: World Tour Review: The More the Merrier?

Nintendo has recently been on a downward spiral. Setting the Wii U aside, there is still a persistent issue on the software side of things. Recent releases like New Super Mario Bros., upcoming titles such as Hyrule Warriors, and the miserable failure that was The Year of Luigi have all been followed by the resounding question: “Why?” Add another game to the list for the questioning, because Mario Golf: World Tour is here.

Kirby Triple Deluxe Review: Deflation in 3D

Kirby-Triple-Deluxe-Logo-590x900

I’m going to put this bluntly: I don’t like Kirby Triple Deluxe. It oftentimes feels like a product custom-built to represent all of my problems with Nintendo at the moment, particularly its reliance on nostalgia to carry the player through the beginning hours. By the end levels of Triple Deluxe, HAL Laboratory manage to make use of the installment’s meager innovations to end things on a reasonably high note, but there’s altogether too much tedium before getting there.

You Should Be Upset About Tomodachi Life

Hey, have you heard about Tomodachi Life? Maybe you have. It’s a quirky life simulator from Nintendo, headed to the 3DS later this year. Kinda like Animal Crossing, but with more user creation tools and agency. Yesterday, after some protestations, Nintendo explained that you wouldn’t be able to have a homosexual relationship in the game.

This is a problem.

The reasons that its a problem are, to me, obvious. The decision is needless and alienating. The statement in Nintendo’s press release is also one of the slimiest things I’ve ever seen emerge from a video game company. Thousands, if not millions of Nintendo fans will be poorly represented.

Here are five arguments I’ve seen in favor of Nintendo, and I’d like to address just why they’re all bullshit, one by one. Good? Good. 

The Legend of Zelda: A Link Between Worlds Review: Best of Both

zelda albwThe title of Nintendo’s newest Zelda game describes much of its charm and ingenuity. This entry stands as a link between two design philosophies: the old, much beloved Zelda formula perfected by A Link to the Past, and the new, more freeing, exploratory format that gives players what they want as soon as they want it. A Link Between Worlds stands at the crossroads of these two different game types, melding them seamlessly. It shows Nintendo isn’t afraid to adapt and try new things in an effort to spice up the Zelda formula before it runs out of steam.

Adventure Time: Explore The Dungeon Because I DON’T KNOW! Review: Grab Your Friends

There may be no television property more ripe for a video game adaptation than Adventure Time. A lot of its stories are, by the creator’s admission, structured like mini-Dungeons & Dragons campaigns. It’s easy to imagine throwing the huge list of characters and the shockingly well-defined world they inhabit into an RPG, getting the writers to cook up anywhere from 20-40 hours of endearing plot, and finding a developer who could design a satisfyingly simple combat mechanic. Paper Mario comes to mind.

Adventure Time: Explore The Dungeon Because I DON’T KNOW! (henceforth referred to as Explore The Dungeon) is not that game.